PRESCRIPTION

This blog is about gut flora, good bacteria, scientific research, and anti-inflammatory food. It’s a prescription for anyone who wishes to eat their way to a healthier life. It’s impossible to overdose on this course of treatment.

Recipes

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Homemade Oat Bread For This Year’s Crayfish Party

It’s the second week of August and finally time for a crayfish party (yup, yet another traditional Swedish eating celebration). Due to the risk of over-fishing, the crayfish harvest in Sweden was for a long time legally limited to the late summer, and therefore, crayfish parties are usually held during August and early September.

A traditional crayfish party will also offer baskets of fresh, white bread, pies and strong cheese. We all know that the good bacteria in our colon die when we fail to take care of them and, truth be told, white bread is not their favorite food. But cheer up! Here’s a recipe for a microbiome-friendly oat bread for this year’s crayfish party.

Homemade Oat Bread
(1 loaf)

1 cup oat flakes
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
2 tsp baking powder
2 eggs
2 carrots
1/2 – 1 cup oat milk
1 tsp fennel seeds, crushed
salt

Mix buckwheat flour, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. In a high speed blender, mix oat flakes, eggs, carrots and oat milk. Add the wet mixture to the dry and stir very well. Add crushed fennel seeds, stir some more, then turn the dough into a loaf pan. Preheat the oven to 212° Fahrenheit (or 100° Celsius) with a rack in the middle. When ready, bake the bread for around 60 minutes.

Tip!
Feel free to adapt the recipe to suit your own tastes. We sometimes add sunflower seeds and flaxseeds to the dough. We’ve also tried adding lemon olive oil, and it turned out great!


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Food Pharmacy

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Pantry Essentials: Checklist for a Well-Stocked Kitchen

Last day of vacay and time to go home. The bags are packed, the house is clean, the fridge is empty, we’ve paid our bills and we’ve said our goodbyes. Farewell, our beloved island, adios. We will meet again.

Getting back in the swing of things after vacation is never easy, especially with an empty pantry. Yes, we know you’re supposed to stock your kitchen before you head out of town, but if you’re anything like us, that just did not happen. So, need some help to restock your pantry? Let’s have a look at the list of pantry staples from our cookbook! Keep your pantry stocked with these basics and you will have a kitchen filled with versatile cooking essentials. Here we go:

Fruits and vegetables
A wide variety (including legumes, such as beans and lentils)

Pantry essentials
Whole grain buckwheat
Buckwheat flour
Bean pasta
Chia seeds
Whole grain sorghum
Sorghum flour
Oat flakes
Flaxseed
Kelp noodles
Nuts, all kinds
Pumpkin seeds
Quinoa
Shredded coconut
Sesame seeds
Almonds

Spices
Basil
Cayenne pepper
Chili pepper
Turmeric
Ginger
Ceylon cinnamon
Cardamom
Cilantro
Cloves
Oregano
Raw cacao powder
Salt and herb salt
Cumin
Black pepper
Thyme

Other flavorings
Fish sauce
Honey
Vegetable stock powder
Sambal oelek
Tahini
Tamari
Apple cider vinegar

Also
Dates
Oat milk (or other plant-based options)
Coconut milk and coconut cream
Crushed tomatoes
Light or medium roast coffee (always organic)
Matcha powder
Dark chocolate (70% or more)
Nut butter
Tofu (always organic)
Vanilla powder
Herbal tea (such as chamomile, yerba mate, peppermint)

Oil
Cold-pressed olive oil
Cold-pressed coconut oil

Supplements
Vitamin D
Krill oil
Synbiotics

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Recipes

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The Ultimate Black Bean Chocolate Cake

Iron plays an important role in the body and is essential to human development and overall health. To make sure you’re getting enough, you should eat a variety of iron-rich foods every day. Here’s the recipe for a yummy iron-rich chocolate cake with black beans, shipped directly from a friend’s summer house on the Swedish west coast.

The Ultimate Black Bean Chocolate Cake
(a fairly large cake)

9 oz. (250 g) black beans
3 oz. (80 g or 7-8) dates
3 Tbsp coconut oil
4 1/2 Tbsp peanut butter
3 1/2 Tbsp cacao powder

Drain and rinse the beans, and pit the dates. Gently melt the coconut oil and the peanut butter over low heat, then process beans, dates, coconut oil and peanut butter in a powerful blender. Add cacao powder and mix until smooth. Evenly distribute the batter into a dish lined with parchment paper, and place in the freezer for around two hours. Remove from the freezer a short while before serving.

Tip!
There are so many ways to boost your iron levels. You can also eat spinach and bell pepper, or make a kale and orange smoothie. Both spinach and kale are high in iron, and to improve your absorption of iron, you should eat it along with a good source of vitamin C.

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Thank you Lisa and Kajsa Eckerström for the recipe.

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Let’s Talk About Food Choices and Climate Change

One of the climate goals that seven of the eight political parties in the Swedish parliament have agreed on is that, by 2030, the climate impact of Sweden’s transport sector should be 70 percent lower than in 2010. The goal is to become one of the world’s first fossil-free welfare nations. However, it’s no secret that the food we eat creates a significant portion of our carbon footprint. The meat industry is one of the biggest polluters in the world, and in Sweden and Norway, giving up meat would actually reduce the carbon footprint more than giving up cars.

Researchers at the University of Oxford found that cutting meat and dairy products from your diet is the best way to protect the planet. Apparently, impacts of the lowest-impact animal products exceed those of the highest-impact vegetables products. The new study, published in the journal Science, is one of the most comprehensive analyses to date of the effects farming can have on the environment.

According to lead author Joseph Poore, adopting a vegan diet is the best way to protect the planet and the single biggest way to reduce the environmental impact.

– It is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car, he says, which would only reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Our eating habits in Sweden give rise to significant emissions of greenhouse gases – 1.8 tonnes per capita every year. A vegan diet would reduce an individual’s carbon footprint from 1.8 tonnes to 500 kg. Yes, that’s right. From 1.8 tonnes to 500 kg. Wow. Reading this, we can’t help but wonder why eating habits isn’t the main topic of all climate change meetings around the world.

For most people, avoiding all animal products might be too much of a change. But switching to a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet, in which you can eat eggs and dairy products, but not meat, poultry, or fish, would result in a 25 percent decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. From 1.8 tonnes to 1.2 tonnes every year. And if that also seems like too big a step, even a slight change in what we eat can have a big impact on the environment. Researchers say that we should start by cutting down on beef, since the environmental impact of beef production is significantly worse than that of pork, dairy and eggs.

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