Recipes

Seed cracker bruschetta.

It’s July, in three hours you will have a house full of guests, and you haven’t the faintest idea what to serve for dinner. Wait, maybe. Last summer, we posted the recipe for this brilliant and incredibly tasty dish here on the blog. The ace up our sleeve is (drum roll, danke): bruschetta!

It’s a piece of cake! Grab the following:

1 red onion
1 box cherry tomatoes
a handful or two of fresh basil
3 large cloves of garlic (oh yes, you can)
a splash of olive oil
a pinch of salt
freshly ground black pepper

And now you just chop it all up (including all three of the garlic cloves, don’t bail out), and spread the mixture on seed crackers. Perfect for welcoming guests, or as a delicious and summery starter. Yum!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Can you make smoothies in advance?

We got this question from a reader, and it’s actually a question we get quite often. It goes like this:

I wonder if you can make these green smoothies the night before? There’s never enough time in the morning. Some smoothies should be consumed immediately, otherwise they may turn bitter. But I haven’t yet figured out which ingredients to avoid when preparing smoothies in advance. You should be able to do that, right?

Of course you can make smoothies in advance! We often prepare 2-3 large servings in one go, and then store some in the fridge for later. Sure, you may lose some of the nutrition, but hey, preparing the smoothie the night before is still a hundred times better than not making it at all. But, you say they may turn bitter? We’re not sure we’ve experienced that. We usually prepare the anti-inflammatory super smoothie from our first book, with kale, avocado, apple (optional), oat flakes (optional), lemon, ginger and water, and it’s just as tasty the next day.

Or, why not put all the ingredients in the blender before you go to bed, and mix in the morning? Rinse and rip the kale into pieces, chop an apple, add half a lemon, some ginger and water, and store the jar in the fridge overnight (wait until the morning to add the avocado, or it will turn brown).

Pressing the start button in the morning is just as easy as making a sandwich or scooping yogurt into a bowl, right? Good luck!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Don’t forget fiber this summer!

Fiber, fiber, fiber. If there’s something we’ve learned, it’s that fiber protects against chronic disease, and helps with healthy aging. According to research, 30 grams of resistant starch a day is enough to achieve the desired benefits.

The Swedish National Food Administration recommends a daily intake of 25 grams of fiber. However, not many of us meet that recommendation. And, since we know it’s sometimes difficult to stay healthy on vacation, we would like to remind you of our favorite summer recipe: the green smoothie. It’s such a quick and easy way to eat lots of healthy fiber. No time to lose! Head to your nearest grocery store, and grab an avocado and a handful or two of spinach. Need some help? Try one of the recipes below.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.

Green smoothie bowl for beginners.

Green smoothie. The best way to add more nutrients to your diet.

 



Recipes

Green smoothie bowl for beginners.

Oh wow, we’re dangerously deep into vacation mode. We only update the blog three days a week, we sleep until 9 am, and walk about 90 percent slower than usual (it could be because of the blister we got from Wednesday’s visit to the gym).

And what else is new? Ah, that’s right, breakfast. The beloved banana porridge is our go-to at home, but not in the countryside. Here, it’s all about green smoothie bowls. One of our daughters likes to add 1 tbsp cocoa powder, because well, she just loves chocolate. But we prefer it just the way it is: green, sweet and sour.

This recipe is from our new cookbook (available here in Swedish), and it’s almost too good to be true: a smoothie bowl for beginners. Forget complicated ingredients, and no prior knowledge is needed.

And if you think “smoothie bowl” is hard to pronounce, just say “green mixture”, with an accent of your choice. Because that’s just what it is.

Green smoothie bowl
(2 servings)

2 green bananas
1 avocado
juice from 1/2 lemon
a (small) handful baby spinach

Add to a blender and mix until smooth and combined. Eat with Luke Skywalker’s granola from our first book (soon available in English).

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

Gluten-free almond scones with dried apricots.

Here’s a recipe for incredibly tasty gluten-free almond scones, sweetened with dried apricots. Perfect for breakfast or with a soup.

The best thing about vacation is that everyday is like Sunday. And since our vacation officially starts today (yaaay), we say bye bye to “Sunday brunch” and make scones on a weekday morning.

We don’t want to brag but this recipe for gluten-free almond scones, sweetened with dried apricots, is incredible. If you want them to be sweeter, add a few teaspoons of honey to the mix.

Almond scones with dried apricots
(makes 6 scones)

1 cup almond flour
1 cup buckwheat flour
0.5 cup dried apricots
almost 2 tsp baking powder
a pinch of salt
0.5-1 cup plant-based milk of your choice
1 egg

Preheat the oven to 100° Celsius, grab an oven tray lined with baking paper or use baking cups. Chop the apricots. Stir together almond flour, buckwheat flour, apricots, baking powder, and salt, while you, in a separate bowl, beat the egg and milk together (or perhaps not at the exact same time).

The dough is supposed to be wet and sticky, but feel free to add some more buckwheat flour if it’s out of control. Make small buns and place them on the oven tray, or pour the mixture into baking cups, and bake for 40 minutes or more (until risen). Remove from the oven and let cool on a rack. Simple and tasty, right?

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Green light for a healthy vegan or vegetarian pregnancy.

Experts say a vegan or vegetarian diet is healthful and nutritionally adequate for pregnant women – choosing a vegan or vegetarian diet may even have upsides!

When it comes to food, scientists disagree on many things. But almost all agree on one thing: eating lots of colorful greens and vegetables is great for your health. On a daily basis, we read about the positive connection between health and a so called plant-based diet, and we try our best to share all the good news here on the blog. One of the most common questions we get from readers is whether it’s possible to have a healthy vegan or vegetarian pregnancy? The answer is: Yes, absolutely! As long as you make sure you get enough iron and vitamin B12.

A couple of weeks ago, there was an article in the New York Times about how scientists now agree that a plant-based diet is healthful and nutritionally adequate for pregnant women. Not eating meat during pregnancy may even have upsides!

Before we log out and get back into vacation mode (aka preparing for a freezing cold dip in the ocean), we would like to leave a message:

Whether you’re a vegan, vegetarian or eat whatever comes to hand – don’t forget how incredibly important it is to eat lots of colorful greens and vegetables every day!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

Golden smoothie that protects against disease?

On account of this post, we came up with a recipe for golden smoothie. It’s more or less like the anti-inflammatory turmeric shot, only kinder and gentler. Or like the golden milk (recipe in our book), only cooler and more fresh.

Grab 1 tbsp turmeric, 1 tsp cinnamon, a pinch of clove, 1 small piece of grated ginger, 1 green banana, 0.5 cup mango, a large dash of plant-based milk of your choice, 1 tsp coconut oil, and some freshly ground black pepper.

Place all ingredients in a blender. Add some ice for extra crispness. Press start. Done.

Ah, almost forgot, we decided to slow down for a few weeks. We got a call from our gut flora, and apparently, it needs some rest. During July, we will update the blog Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

See you Wednesday!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Tip: Pre-order the cookbook.

Two weeks ago, while we were proofreading the cookbook and biting our nails from worry, our dear editor Linnéa told us that we’ve already sold “a couple of thousand copies”. At first, we were sure her head was in a whirl. Then we realised that you can pre-order the cookbook online, at Adlibris.

And, considering that the first book (soon available in English!) sold out quickly, and a couple of times during the fall as well, it’s probably a good idea to pre-order if you would like to lay hands on one or two copies of the cookbook.

And the picture above? Obviously, it’s from the cookbook. From one of our sleepovers, when we were having one of our all time favorite breakfasts: golden oatmeal.

Pre-order the book in Swedish here.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Turmeric may reduce the risk of cancer.

Can turmeric prevent cancer? Last Tuesday, along with everyone else in Sweden, we watched BBC’s Trust me, I’m a doctor, and the episode “Does turmeric really help protect us from cancer?”. Michael Mosley and the doctors undertake one of their most ambitious projects ever – testing whether turmeric could help protect us against cancer and other diseases, such as depression and allergies.

100 volunteers were divided into three groups. The first group took placebo pills, the second took turmeric as a supplement, and the third group took 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder daily. The project went on for 6 weeks, and the results were fascinating. There was no difference in the methylation of the DNA of the volunteers who took the placebo pills, or those who took the supplement pills. But in the group who were cooking with turmeric powder, the results were striking. On one gene in particular, the researchers saw a dramatic change. The gene is associated with a number of common disorders:

* depression and anxiety
* asthma and eczema
* cancer

Wow, more turmeric to the people! In our book, as well as in our lectures, we talk about how we can influence gene activation through our lifestyle choices and eating habits. This project is an amazing example of how even a small lifestyle change (cooking with turmeric), can affect our genes and DNA methylation patterns, known to be associated with cancer!

If you haven’t seen the episode, you can find it here.
Or here. Or read about it here

Turmeric recipes from the blog:
The professor’s anti-inflammatory turmeric shot
Anti-inflammatory mango stew
Marinated tofu skewers with potato and watermelon salad

Anti-inflammatory turmeric dip

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

Dairy-free coconut yogurt.

It’s time for something incredibly exciting: let’s test one of the recipes from the cookbook. And by the way, if you’re worried it will sell out, you can now pre-order it HERE (so far only available in Swedish). If you don’t already have Stig’s synbiotics at home, get it HERE.

And now, dear friend, you’re ready for our favorite recipe: dairy-free coconut yogurt.

We promise you: it’s super easy!

Just grab 1 can (400ml) of coconut milk from the fridge, pour off the liquid, and add 1 dose of Stig’s synbiotics and 1 tsp honey to the thick part. Stir until blended. Let it rest in a warm place (we usually keep ours on top of the fridge), and taste after 24 hours. If you would like a thicker consistency, move to the fridge and let it sit some more.

Too sour? Yes, but what are you waiting for, top with whatever goodies you like, and start eating!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.