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Soda Giant Focuses on the Hip Health Drink Kombucha

Nobody can have missed how kombucha, the trendy health drink, has popped up on store shelves everywhere. The drink, initially a mystical bottle found in only well-stocked health stores, is now widely available in countless flavor varieties and is seen among the hippest restaurants and cafes. Even grocers have hopped on the bandwagon and filled their fridges with kombucha. So, is kombucha just a trend? Hardly.

Kombucha is actually a brew several thousand years old originating in Korea where it was well-regarded for cleansing the body of toxins and restoring energy. It is usually made from a base of black or green tea which is fermented with sugar as well as a type of bacterial culture or tea-sponge called the symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY). With proper nursing, SCOBY multiplies and through its offspring can live eternally. The web is brimming with articles about kombucha’s many healthy benefits, but whether it’s really a miracle or not has yet to be determined. So far, there is unfortunately no sufficient scientific evidence that it cleanses the blood from poisons, affect cholesterol levels, blood pressure, or protects against diabetes. Some exciting findings have been made after scientists have tested the beverage in animals, but we are still waiting for the results that show how it affects the health of humans.

Enough about that. Fall’s most exciting news on the subject is that soda giant Coca-Cola is getting on board this trend and will begin to sell kombucha. Coca-Cola has not only acquired the British coffee chain Costa but also bought the Australian company Organic & Raw Trading Co., which invests heavily in kombucha. Apparently, this is one of many steps the company will take to maintain its place as a drink manufacturing giant and gain a stake in an increasingly health conscious market.

We just hope that Coca-Cola chooses to make as pure and natural kombucha as possible. Some bottles sold in stores today unfortunately contain unnecessarily large amounts of added fruit juice and sugar, which in our eyes destroys the entire idea behind ​​the drink. It’s a bit like, sitting on a carefully folded origami figure or drawing with a pen on a real Picasso.

Either way, we like kombucha and welcome hip health trends that help to remove soda from the shelves. Our prediction is that kombucha is here to stay.

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