Food Pharmacy

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Pantry Essentials: Checklist for a Well-Stocked Kitchen

Last day of vacay and time to go home. The bags are packed, the house is clean, the fridge is empty, we’ve paid our bills and we’ve said our goodbyes. Farewell, our beloved island, adios. We will meet again.

Getting back in the swing of things after vacation is never easy, especially with an empty pantry. Yes, we know you’re supposed to stock your kitchen before you head out of town, but if you’re anything like us, that just did not happen. So, need some help to restock your pantry? Let’s have a look at the list of pantry staples from our cookbook! Keep your pantry stocked with these basics and you will have a kitchen filled with versatile cooking essentials. Here we go:

Fruits and vegetables
A wide variety (including legumes, such as beans and lentils)

Pantry essentials
Whole grain buckwheat
Buckwheat flour
Bean pasta
Chia seeds
Whole grain sorghum
Sorghum flour
Oat flakes
Flaxseed
Kelp noodles
Nuts, all kinds
Pumpkin seeds
Quinoa
Shredded coconut
Sesame seeds
Almonds

Spices
Basil
Cayenne pepper
Chili pepper
Turmeric
Ginger
Ceylon cinnamon
Cardamom
Cilantro
Cloves
Oregano
Raw cacao powder
Salt and herb salt
Cumin
Black pepper
Thyme

Other flavorings
Fish sauce
Honey
Vegetable stock powder
Sambal oelek
Tahini
Tamari
Apple cider vinegar

Also
Dates
Oat milk (or other plant-based options)
Coconut milk and coconut cream
Crushed tomatoes
Light or medium roast coffee (always organic)
Matcha powder
Dark chocolate (70% or more)
Nut butter
Tofu (always organic)
Vanilla powder
Herbal tea (such as chamomile, yerba mate, peppermint)

Oil
Cold-pressed olive oil
Cold-pressed coconut oil

Supplements
Vitamin D
Krill oil
Synbiotics

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Food Pharmacy

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Let’s Talk About Food Choices and Climate Change

One of the climate goals that seven of the eight political parties in the Swedish parliament have agreed on is that, by 2030, the climate impact of Sweden’s transport sector should be 70 percent lower than in 2010. The goal is to become one of the world’s first fossil-free welfare nations. However, it’s no secret that the food we eat creates a significant portion of our carbon footprint. The meat industry is one of the biggest polluters in the world, and in Sweden and Norway, giving up meat would actually reduce the carbon footprint more than giving up cars.

Researchers at the University of Oxford found that cutting meat and dairy products from your diet is the best way to protect the planet. Apparently, impacts of the lowest-impact animal products exceed those of the highest-impact vegetables products. The new study, published in the journal Science, is one of the most comprehensive analyses to date of the effects farming can have on the environment.

According to lead author Joseph Poore, adopting a vegan diet is the best way to protect the planet and the single biggest way to reduce the environmental impact.

– It is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car, he says, which would only reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Our eating habits in Sweden give rise to significant emissions of greenhouse gases – 1.8 tonnes per capita every year. A vegan diet would reduce an individual’s carbon footprint from 1.8 tonnes to 500 kg. Yes, that’s right. From 1.8 tonnes to 500 kg. Wow. Reading this, we can’t help but wonder why eating habits isn’t the main topic of all climate change meetings around the world.

For most people, avoiding all animal products might be too much of a change. But switching to a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet, in which you can eat eggs and dairy products, but not meat, poultry, or fish, would result in a 25 percent decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. From 1.8 tonnes to 1.2 tonnes every year. And if that also seems like too big a step, even a slight change in what we eat can have a big impact on the environment. Researchers say that we should start by cutting down on beef, since the environmental impact of beef production is significantly worse than that of pork, dairy and eggs.

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Eat the Seasons: August

New month, new possibilities, new mantras, new recipes and most importantly, new fruits and vegetables in season. As you can see, we’ll be making lots of berry pies, a ton of parsley pesto and beet hummus, coleslaw, cauliflower risotto and cold potato salads in August. Yummy!

Fruits:
Apricots, figs, lemon, melon, nectarines, peaches, plums, pears, rhubarb, grapes

Berries:
Blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, gooseberries, cherries, redcurrants, blackcurrants

Vegetables:
Blanched celery, cauliflower, broad beans, broccoli, fennel, cucumber, artichoke, kohlrabi, Swedish turnip, yellow onion, red onion, scallion, corn, turnip, swiss chard, carrots, parsnip, bell pepper, potatoes, pumpkin, leek, celeriac, different types of radishes and cabbages, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, arugula, snow peas, spinach, zucchini, tomatoes

Herbs:
Basil, dill, chives, parsley

Source: https://www.aktavara.org

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Probiotics: Yay or Nay?

Definitely yay! Probiotics have been part of our everyday routine for years, and it’s just as important as brushing our teeth when we wake up in the morning. Probiotics are commonly known as friendly, good, and healthy bacteria that live in the human gut.

The gut flora has received considerable attention in recent years and scientists are constantly trying to learn more about the connection between gut bacteria and both mental and physical health. A couple of days ago, we found this very interesting study carried out by researchers from the University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden. The study, recently published by the Journal of Internal Medicine, found that dietary supplements with friendly gut bacteria may affect the human skeleton and help to maintain healthy bone density among older women. Amazing!

The study involved 90 elderly women, and they were randomised to receive either a probiotic supplement or an identical-looking placebo every day for a whole year. After a year, researchers measured the women’s bone loss in their lower legs and compared it with measurements from when the study began. The women who received the probiotic powder had lost only half as much bone compared to those who received inactive powders. Yes, you heard it right. The use of probiotic supplements resulted in a 50% reduction in bone loss.

Brittleness of the bones, or osteoporosis, is a bone disease that occurs when the bones become porous and weak, which can lead to increased risk of fracture. It’s the most common reason for a broken bone among the elderly, especially among elderly women. Unfortunately, a majority of women over 80 years of age have the disease. Osteoporosis is often first diagnosed after the first fracture occurs, and since the risk of fracture increases after the first break, preventative treatment is needed. Amazingly, this study opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among older women. What a great discovery!

And you know what? The treatment was well tolerated by the patients! The women who received the probiotic powder did not produce more side effects than those experienced by the women who received the placebo. This is such great news! Probiotics for president!

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