Food Pharmacy, Recipes

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The Scoop on Celiacs Disease

Just the other day was International Celiac Day.  Celiac disease, or gluten intolerance, is a chronic disease in which gluten protein causes inflammation that damages the mucosal lining of the small intestines. The ability to absorb vitamins, minerals and other nutrients is destroyed, which can lead to nutritional deficiency and poor health.

In the last few decades the disease has been on the rise in most western countries, ranging between 1-3% of the populations. However, estimates predict that more cases go undiagnosed than diagnosed.

Since we love all things gut health and personally know people with celiac disease, we got to thinking…isn’t it high time for a gut-friendly alternative to ice cream cones so the joy of sunshine and frozen cold treats can be enjoyed by all, including the trillions of microscopic good guys hanging out in our gut?!

Voilà! Gluten-free ice cream cones and a scoop of strawberry ice cream to go along with it.

3 gluten-free cones

2 eggs
2 tsp honey
1 tsp psyllium husk
7 tbsp of almond flour

Heat the oven to 200°C/ 400°F. Whisk the eggs until fluffy and then add in the honey and psyllium. Gently stir in the almond flour. The batter is ready.

Now draw three circles on a baking paper, about 14 cm/5.5 inches in diameter. Use a bowl of similar size to make things easier. Place the paper upside down on the baking sheet (so that the color doesn’t stick to the waffles) and spread the batter into thin, even layers, filling up each circle. Bake for about 5 minutes until they have a golden color.

Once they are out of the oven quickly loosen the waffles from the paper and roll them up into cones by hand. Allow them to cool on a rack before filling them with ice cream.

Lightning fast strawberry ice cream

2 frozen bananas
1 cup frozen strawberries

Combine the bananas and strawberries in a blender or food processor and blend until you have a nice frozen treat. Done! Scoop into your homemade cones and top with desired toppings (we used dried raspberries and cacao nibs).  

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Food Pharmacy

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Happy Easter!

After a few refreshing days in the countryside, where the days were filled with cliff walks, icy dips in the spring water, an Easter salad and discussions that were actually followed by excess time to allow reflection, we are now back at home. We just want to wish you a nice Easter weekend and we hope you too will have time to do whatever it is your heart desires. Our plans include things like, a booked massage and some down time with Netflix. Happy Easter!

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Food Pharmacy

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The Dutch Have Antibiotic Resistance Under Control

Antibiotic resistance is a growing issue, the current prognosis is that by 2050 it could be the cause of more deaths than cancer, even though the number of deaths from cancer is estimated to have tripled by then. Whoa!

Fortunately, there has been a lot of research in the area over the past decades and guidelines for treatment with antibiotics have changed. We know now that restrictive use is the key to success, but unfortunately, not all countries are equally capable of ensuring that doctors only recommend an antibiotic course when it is truly needed.

The Scandinavian countries are often raised as a role model, but they are not alone. One country that has the problem of antibiotic resistance under control is the Netherlands. UMC Utrecht reports that, if someone contracts a multi-resistant bacteria in the Netherlands, the risk of death is not greater than if they had contracted a bacteria which can currently be treated with antibiotics.

The fact that the Netherlands has antibiotic resistance under control is probably due to Dutch doctors, like many Scandinavian doctors, prescribing relatively few doses of antibiotics to their patients. And, when they write out a prescription, it is rarely the type of broad spectrum antibiotics that fight many different bacteria simultaneously, but rather forms that are directed towards a specific bacteria. This too helps to keep antibiotic resistance in check.

In contrast to many other countries, the laboratories in the Netherlands are also quick to analyze the bacteria, which means that people infected with resistant bacteria quickly get the right antibiotics. The Dutch are also proactive in preventing the spread of resistant bacteria. Patients seeking care in hospital need to, for example, inform the staff if they have sought care abroad and such cases are isolated until it is known if they are infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Go Netherlands!

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What Time of Year Are We Getting Vitamin D From the Sun?

You have probably heard that the body forms vitamin D when the sun shines on our skin. But did you know that it only works in the summer? In order for the body to be able to form vitamin D from the sun’s rays, the sun must be at least 45 degrees above the horizon. Which, if you find yourself living above the 37th parallel (37 degrees latitude), it tends not to for about half of the year during the winter months of November to March. This “Vitamin D winter” gets even longer the further north you live. Take Sweden for example, where vitamin D winter can start already in September and go through April.

However during the summer months or “Vitamin D season” it’s enough to be out in the sun for about 20 minutes in the mid-day to fully charge your vitamin D deposits. Of course this varies based on skin tone, cloud cover etc., but generally speaking it doesn’t take much. And also worth noting, there’s no point in overdoing it, being out longer doesn’t translate into generating more vitamin D – which means that there is no reason to be in the sun for so long that you burn yourself and cause skin damage.

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