PRESCRIPTION

This blog is about gut flora, good bacteria, scientific research, and anti-inflammatory food. It’s a prescription for anyone who wishes to eat their way to a healthier life. It’s impossible to overdose on this course of treatment.

Recipes

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Chocolate Hummus – For When You Can’t Choose Between Chocolate and Hummus

It’s Friday, the sun is out (which is a welcome sight after the winter months), but unfortunately, the bright light is drawing some attention to areas that are a bit dusty and dirty. However, we’re not in the mood for cleaning. Not at all. Instead, we feel like making chocolate hummus. You would think that chocolate and hummus are as compatible as Tom & Jerry, but trust us – and please do not stop reading.

Just like regular hummus, chocolate hummus contains chickpeas. But that’s where the similarities end. This is more of a chocolate cake mixture. Who would think that a cookie dough could contain such large amounts of protein, minerals and fiber?

Skip the carrot sticks and slice some strawberries and apples instead. The perfect evening snack!

Chocolate Hummus
(1 bowl)

1 can chickpeas
1 green banana
2 Tbsp raw cacao
3 dates
0.5 cup coconut cream

Use a blender to combine. Add to a bowl and serve with fruit (or spoon the mixture into bowls and serve as chocolate mousse).

Want to add even more nutrients?
Yay, you’re becoming a true nutrient hunter! We suggest you sprout the chickpeas for a couple of days, instead of buying canned ones. But don’t forget to soak them before eating – don’t worry, it’s super easy. Just bring water to a bowl and remove from the stove. Then add the sprouted chickpeas to the water and wait five minutes. Done!

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Food Pharmacy

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Our Morning Routine

It’s early morning, and we’re in the midst of dreaming about mint green pelicans and world peace when the alarm goes off. Obviously, we turn it off. But what happens afterwards?

Ice Cream
Yes, you heard it right. Our kids eat ice cream in the morning. It’s quickly prepared by combining frozen berries, green banana and some plant-based milk in the blender. Yup, it’s just as easy as toasting a slice of bread. Add some cinnamon, cardamom or raw cacao, and sprinkle some berries, nuts or coconut on top.

Witches’ Brew
While the kids have their ice cream, we eat a tablespoon of Bertil’s brew. You don’t necessarily have to drink it in the morning, but hey, if you want to make sure you don’t forget, make it part of your morning routine. If we don’t have a bottle of the witches’ brew at home, we prepare some of Zlatan’s anti-inflammatory turmeric shot. They both contain lots of turmeric and other great stuff that will help strengthen the immune system.

Apple Cider Vinegar
If we’re in a hurry, with time for neither witches’ brew nor turmeric shot, we start the day by having a big glass of water and about a tablespoon or two of apple cider vinegar. Out of vinegar? Squeeze some lemon instead.

Green Smoothie
In a perfect world, the world of ideas, we skip breakfast in order to give our cells an opportunity to reboot. In the ideal world, we fast for 18 or 16 hours and eat over a period of 6 or 8 hours. But when the real world becomes too challenging, we fix things with a green smoothie. It’s almost ideal because the body doesn’t absorb raw vegetables until they’ve reached the colon. Basically, you can eat a little earlier than usual but still allow the organ rest and detox for another two to three more hours.

Coffee and Tea
We have our morning coffee or tea in the office. Nowadays, it’s usually a cup of tea. If you want to avoid most of the side effects from coffee, like headaches for example, black tea is a great substitute. Our next step is to replace the black tea with yerba mate. The yerba mate brew has been said to enhance both memory, mood, and alertness. It will offer the same strength of coffee in the morning – but without its side effects.

No breakfast?
On a regular weekday, we skip breakfast and don’t consume anything besides liquids for at least 16 hours. Our first meal of the day is usually lunch. Except on Wednesdays when we always have breakfast with one of our best friends. And of course, on the weekends, when breakfasts can be both long and luxurious. Luckily scientists say it’s enough to do intermittent fasting a few times a week!

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Recipes, Therese Elgquist

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Roasted Cauliflower with Lightly Mashed Green Peas and Apple Sauerkraut

It’s time for one of our favorites, roasted cauliflower. It can be served as a light lunch, be part of a buffet or, if you’re very hungry, with some fresh tomatoes and avocado. Food prepping is always a good idea, and it makes cooking so much easier. Make some extra wild rice and store in the fridge for other dinners later this week. You can thank us later.


Roasted Cauliflower with Lightly Mashed Green Peas and Apple Sauerkraut

(serves 4)

1 big head cauliflower
1 lb frozen green peas
5 Tbsp homemade pesto*
Almost 1 cup wild rice (or 2-3 cups when cooked)
Fresh basil
2 Tbsp cold-pressed olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Apple Sauerkraut
1 cup sauerkraut
1 red apple

Preheat the oven to 212° Fahrenheit, then take out all the ingredients and a baking sheet.

Defrost the green peas, and mash them gently with the pesto. Add salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Remove the biggest outer leaves from the cauliflower and cut them into pieces. Put them together with the smaller leaves in a bowl and add some olive oil. Cut the cauliflower head into slices, sprinkle with olive oil and spread out into a single layer on the baking sheet. Roast until tender, approximately 45-60 minutes. Add the leaves during the last 15 minutes.

Spread wild rice and pesto peas over the cauliflower.

Shred the apple against the largest teeth of a grater and toss together with the sauerkraut. Serve with the rest of the veggies. Don’t forget to sprinkle fresh basil on top.


* Homemade pesto

Use a blender and mix 2 large handfuls of basil, 0.5 cup pumpkin seeds, 1 small garlic clove, 0.5 cup olive oil and 1 tsp apple cider vinegar. Add salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

 

Eh, wild rice?
Wild rice is really a grain and it’s called rice mainly because of appearance. It has a nutty, earthy flavor, and is high in protein, fiber and vitamins. To cut down on the cooking time, It’s beneficial to soak the wild rice in lots of water and 1/2 Tbsp unfiltered apple cider vinegar overnight prior to cooking. Soaking also renders the nutrients more digestible and easily assimilated. Awesome, right?

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Bertil Wosk

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Let’s Ask Bertil Wosk: How Healthy Are Eggs?

Remember Bertil Wosk, the founder of the supplement brand Holistic, who provided us with the recipe for his very own witches’ brew a couple of months ago? It’s time for a new segment on the blog and we call it “let’s ask Bertil Wosk”. He knows everything and is kind enough to answer some of our questions.

– We’re curious about eggs. How will they affect your health? Is it all bad, or is it okay to eat eggs now and then?

It depends on who you’re asking. A vegan will say NO because they’re animal products. Many vegans avoid honey as well. But nutrient-wise, both eggs and honey (in reasonable amounts) are good for you. Eggs are a nutrition powerhouse. They contain high quality protein, minerals, vitamins, and lecithin, which contains necessary nutrients for bodily functions and is especially good for the nervous system and the brain. However, foods that are high in protein, such as eggs, meat and fish, lead the body to produce excess acid. But you can compensate by eating lots of vegetables. Some say that eggs contain harmful bacteria (similar to those in meat and fish), but if you’re healthy, that shouldn’t be a problem. Especially if the eggs are boiled or cooked.

Because they’re high in cholesterol, eggs have gotten a bad reputation. Well, we need to sort this out. There is no evidence that cholesterol is bad for you. On the contrary, cholesterol production is incredibly important, and 80% of the cholesterol in you body is in fact manufactured in the liver. Only about 20% comes from the foods you eat. Also, your cholesterol levels are more influenced by fast carbs (carbohydrates that digest quickly), than eggs. In general, people who eat a lot of fast-digesting carbs have higher cholesterol levels, than, for example, people on LCHF diets.

To sum up, eggs are not the villains they have been made out to be. In fact, they’re probably healthier than most foods on the store shelves. Okay, a varied raw food diet is probably more beneficial to your health, but eggs are not the reason chronic diseases are on the rise.

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