Food Pharmacy

Swedes eat more meat than ever.

After a long summer, we’re finally back at the office. And, waiting on our desks was a report, presented by the University of Oxford at the, try saying this three times fast, 20th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analysis.

The researchers found taxes on red and processed meat would lead to huge and vital cuts in climate emissions, as well as saving lives via healthier diets. The link between meat consumption and disease has been widely known for years, and so has the direct link to climate change – the meat industry is the biggest culprit, and the global healthcare costs due to the consumption of red and processed meat are estimated to 300 billion USD (!) by the year 2020.

Still, Swedes are consuming more meat than ever. Don’t be fooled by the growing interest in vegan and vegetarian food, new figures show a continued increase in meat consumption. And, we’re sorry to say, last year we beat the record: Swedes consumed 87.7 kilograms of meat per person in 2016.

A record we should not be proud of, and a dangerous trend that has to stop. Dear Government, please tax unhealthy foods that cause inflammation and lead to illness, and subsidize foods that are actually good for us. Please, once and for all.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

The five minute jungle soup.

A jungle shirt requires a jungle soup. That’s old news. So today, we rummage through our friend’s fridge and prepare a quick five-minute-soup.

Jungle soup
(2 servings)

1/2 zucchini
1/2 cantaloupe
10 cocktail tomatoes
1/2 lemon
2 spring onions (including the tops)
0.5 cup water
a (large) handful fresh cilantro
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Mix. Quick, easy and delicious!

Or, maybe not that quick and easy. We just realized that our friend doesn’t own a blender. Gah. And to be completely honest, Sofie, your hand blender is on its last legs as well.

Five hours later, our five-minute-soup was finally ready to go, but luckily it didn’t affect the taste.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

Blueberry pie, with a flourish of trumpets!

Let’s have some blueberry pie and celebrate the fact that our cookbook is now available in Swedish bookstores. Seeing the book on the shelf for the first time is such an incredible feeling, and we can’t believe it’s finally finished. And of course, what makes it even more special is that it fits perfectly right next to our first book. Like Chip ‘n’ Dale – just as we had hoped.

Anyway, enough about us and our feelings. It’s time for this incredibly tasty blueberry pie. We got the recipe from the book’s graphic designer, the lovely Anna (recipe originally found here).

Blueberry celebration pie
(1 pie)

Crust:
1 cup soaked cashews
1 cup coconut flakes
4 fresh dates
a pinch of salt

Blueberry filling:
225 g frozen (thawed) blueberries
1 apple
5 fresh dates
juice from 1/2 lemon
1 tsp pure vanilla powder
1 1/2  tbsp psyllium husk

Soak the nuts for about an hour. Make the crust by mixing together all the ingredients, and gently push the pie dough into the bottom and sides of a bread pan or a pie plate (use parchment paper). Mix the ingredients for the filling, and spoon over the crust. Refrigerate for half an hour before serving.

My goodness, photos don’t do justice to the beauty of this pie. It’s almost black. Maybe it looks better in the living room? Worth a try.

Nope, not at all. But who cares, you’re smart and you know what to expect – a nutty crust with delicious blueberry filling. And, thanks to the psyllium husk, it is not too runny and not too thick. Just perfect. Yum!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

Icy and creamy chocolate milkshake.

Heads up for an icy and creamy chocolate milkshake (say what, ice cream?) that your kids will love. And since it’s full of good ingredients, we say it’s safe to eat this every day of the week.

We love that our cute kids were three years younger in these photos. Gah, time moves way too fast? Anyway, here you go.

Chocolate milkshake
(2 servings)

2 frozen bananas (sliced)
1/2 avocado
1 cup gluten-free oat flakes
1,5-2 cups water
3 soaked dates
1 tsp pure vanilla powder
1-2 tbsp raw cacao
1/2 tbsp cinnamon
1 tbsp coconut oil

Place in a blender and press start.

The frozen bananas will do the trick. Thanks to them, the milkshake will be super creamy, almost like ice cream. Just grab two bananas, slice them into rounds, and put in the freezer for a couple of hours. And then you just add all the ingredients, including the bananas, to a blender. If you want, you can replace the oat flakes and the water with plant-based milk of your choice.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

The Food Pharmacy girls’ new recipes for your belly.

This weekend we have a) spent a lot of time in the car travelling from Stockholm to Gothenburg, and b) still not recovered from being referred to as “the Food Pharmacy girls” on the cover of the Swedish magazine Topphälsa.

Ah, look at those feet. Or should we say jeans?

Question: What do you do when your feet aren’t photo-friendly?

Answer: You cover them up with jeans.

Anyhow, we flip the magazine open and blush. “The Food Pharmacy success – magic food for your health”. Ok, the plan was to not show any of our new recipes here on the blog, well, we thought we would sell more books that way (pre-order here in Swedish). But, too late for that now since one of the best recipes is outed in the magazine: our lasagna with pumpkin parmesan. Warmly recommended!

And on the next page, you’ll find our chinese food (we suggest you double the recipe, it only gets better over night), our buckwheat pancakes, and our massaged everyday go-to salad. Thank you Topphälsa for the article, and with these words, it’s officially time for a foot bath.

No, wait a minute, we just have to…

This is definitely not an interior design blog, but we just have to show you the fabulous home that we stayed in when we visited the Swedish festival Way Out West this weekend. Belongs to a dear friend. Love it!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

5 herbs and spices you can use every day.

When we first understood that spices are packed with antioxidants, and that they are an excellent protection against inflammation, we decided to stock our whole kitchen with spices. Dried herbs and spices were put in the spice cabinet and fresh herbs ended up in pots, in the fridge and in the freezer. When we season with cumin, clove, parsley, turmeric, black pepper, oregano, dill, rosemary and cilantro, we add more antioxidants to simple everyday recipes. We were soon able to identify which spices the kids loved the most, and simply added a little bit more of those when we were about to introduce new foods that we suspected they would refuse to try. We give you five of our favorites (super hard to choose, but someone’s gotta do it).

Turmeric By now you must know that we love turmeric. In shots, stews, and in our golden milk. It’s strongly anti-inflammatory, and every week we experiment by adding some turmeric to new vegetarian dishes. We eat both fresh turmeric root and the ground spice, even though the fresh one has a tendency to stain eeeverything. Yummy!

Ginger Can you favor one spice over another? Yes, you can. This is our favorite. Preferably fresh in a green smoothie or chopped in a cup of tea. Or ground ginger in home made seasonings (delicious in a mixture of turmeric, cinnamon and cardamom). Heavenly peppery and anti-inflammatory!

Ceylon cinnamon You’ll be amazed by how something that tastes like candy can be so healthy.  Our children and we love to add some cinnamon to our banana porridge, the fruit salad and the pastries. If you eat a lot of cinnamon, it’s wise to go for the one named ceylon cinnamon – you’ll find it in well-supplied grocery stores. “Ordinary” cinnamon has high levels of a substance called coumarin, known to cause liver damage if taken in high doses.  Some ordinary cinnamon now and then is not to be worried about, but if you, like we do, eat a lot of cinnamon, make sure you buy ceylon.

Thyme + oregano This is a really good combo that we use a lot. Magical in a warm tomato sauce, and just as good in a basic vinaigrette. Close your eyes and try to imagine some nice cold-pressed olive oil, a couple of drops of vinegar, perhaps a teaspoon of mustard, and loads of thyme and oregano. Sooo good… Increases both the nutritional content and the flavor of any salad!

Garlic It’s no longer a pleasant experience to ride the elevator with us.  And it’s not unusual that we shovel 2 or 3 raw cloves of garlic into our mouths right before a meeting. Garlic goes with everything – guacamole, lentil soup and hummus – but when it comes to our breaths, we’ve completely lost it. Garlic is highly addictive, and works wonders for your Lukes!

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Here you are – a bunch of scientific articles about how food can prevent disease.

We’re back in Stockholm, still trying to squeeze out the last drops of summer, which basically means that we:

– still treat ourselves with sleep-ins
– skip doing the dishes after breakfast
– are reluctant to do anything before lunch
– are reluctant to do anything after lunch
– would rather lay in the hammock all day reading

And speaking of reading, we can happily announce that Journal of Geriatric Cardiology has published a special issue on the theme of the benefits of eating a plant-based diet. Here you are – a whole bunch of scientific articles about how plant-based food can prevent chronic disease, and even premature death.

Nothing wrong with Läckberg, but why not try something new from time to time.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/issues/293850/

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Recipes

Smoothie with kale, banana and coconut water.

The good thing about boat trips is that you get a lot of quality time with your family. The less good thing is that you have liiimited space to cook. Plus, it seems like all the taverns have been to the same kick-off, and agreed to never ever put a single vegetable on the menu. Let’s just say, our good bacteria scream for nutrients after only a couple of days.

But, we do have a blender! And after yesterday’s visit to the vegan spot Funky Fresh Foods in Oslo, Norway, we felt like recreating their kale smoothie with the taste of bananas. Hence, that is what we did this morning, while the other family members cast off (clearly mad at us for not helping).

The result? Delicious!

Smoothie with kale, banana and coconut water
(makes 1 pitcher)

200 g kale
2 small avocados
2 small green bananas
1/2 lemon
0.5 cup oat flakes
around 4 cups coconut water

Mix.

Such a great lunch smoothie. And, you can drink it and refuel the boat, s i m u l t a n e o u s l y. Yup, not kidding.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Food Pharmacy – The Cookbook is finally here!

Sitting on the dock of the bay (or Aker brygge, a seaside promenade in Oslo, Norway), holding this priceless gem in our hands. Here it is: Food Pharmacy – The Cookbook (available so far only in Swedish). Our first book’s baby sister has finally arrived from the printing office. And it’s every bit as perfect as we could have hoped.

With one tiiiiiny, tiiiiiny exception. It’s soaking wet.

We’re on a sailboat and last night, when it was stuffy and suffocating, someone (Mia) opened a window, that someone (Mia) forgot to close when it was time for departure. So now, our much longed-for, anti-inflammatory cookbook (that by now should have filled our nostrils with printing ink), smells like seaweed, saltwater, and perhaps, septic tank.

Anyhow, we’ll try and flick through a few pages (fingers crossed it stays together).

We guess it’s no longer a secret that it consists of five chapters: The Blender, Instead of a Sandwich, Everyday Cooking, Fine Dining, and Friday Night Snacks. The granola squares above is from the chapter Friday Night Snacks, and they will make you grin like a Cheshire cat.

And, oh, this Bibimbap. Let’s just say, it’s not by any means repulsive, quite the opposite.  It’s from the chapter Fine Dining, in which we also treat you and your gut flora to three pretty perfect three-course dinner menus.  

And here’s a glimpse of the “pangbiffar” from the chapter Everyday Cooking (veggie patties that have absolutely nothing in common with “pannbiffar”, or Swedish meat patties, that are often served in Swedish schools).

The chapter Instead of a Sandwich contains all kinds of recipes, like muffins, yogurt, ice cream, smoothies and golden oatmeal. Well, no sandwiches, surprise, surprise.

The first chapter – The Blender – almost exclusively contains meals and snacks prepared in under 5 minutes. Including the soup above – Food Pharmacy’s pumpkin soup with a busload of cilantro.

In Food Pharmacy – The Cookbook, you will also find a solid/soaking wet background chapter. It’s like a recap or a fast-forward version of the first book (but with some new angles and approaches).

And now, we would like to say thank you to all those involved. And once again, sorry for dropping this precious beauty into the ocean.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.



Food Pharmacy

Kale protects against low-grade inflammation.

Did you know that the antioxidant lutein, found in kale and broccoli, protects against low-grade inflammation, and therefore, chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease?

Lutein belongs to the family of carotenoids, which are naturally occurring fat-soluble pigments, found in the cells of a wide variety of dark-green and yellow fruits and vegetables, like kale, broccoli, spinach and citrus fruits.  

Studies on animals and healthy humans have shown that carotenoids are associated with lower levels of low-grade inflammation in the body. This led scientists at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden to ask if carotenoids may help to lower low-grade inflammation in sick patients with overly sensitive immune cells as well. Said and done, a group of scientists began studying people with vascular spasm, or who had suffered from a heart attack. Typically, these patients suffer from acute low-grade inflammation, and therefore, they have increased risk of having another heart attack. The studies showed lutein may also help to lower low-grade inflammation in these patients.

The study was performed on sick people, but that doesn’t mean you should wait until you’re sick to start thinking about your lutein intake. According to research, we should all ensure we get enough lutein, as a preventive measure. Lutein is said to help reduce hardening of the arteries, and studies have shown that young people with higher concentrations of lutein in their blood have fewer clogged arteries.

In other words, yet another reason to add some extra kale to the family smoothie.

Some recipes with kale:

Massaged kale salad with avocado.

Crispy kale chips – awesome for your colon.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our book in Polish here and professor Stig Bengmark’s synbiotic here.