Food Pharmacy, Press

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Food Pharmacy Featured in Wall Street Journal Magazine

Nope, it’s not April Fools’ Day, and this is not a prank. But it is too good to be true and we have to pinch ourselves to see if we’re dreaming. This is the coolest thing we’ve ever done – no ifs, ands or buts about it. This weekend, Food Pharmacy was featured in WSJ Magazine.

Due to limited space, some questions – and, if we may say so, brilliant answers – were left out. For example, we shared that we go to the same gynecologist (strangely enough, they decided not to share that piece of information with their readers). Anyhow, we couldn’t be happier and prouder with the way it’s all come together. In the article, we give you a taste of the Swedish culture and lifestyle, and mention some of our most precious Swedish hideaways. Like Marstrand, and our favorite café Pom&Flora. And Åsa Stenerhag. If you’re not familiar with her work, please follow this link.

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Food Pharmacy, Press, Recipes

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The turmeric shot you’ll want to do every morning in 2018

A few weeks ago, our first book Food Pharmacy: A Guide to Gut Bacteria, Anti-Inflammatory Foods, and Eating for Health was released in English. Yay! Since then, we’ve gotten lots of new readers here on the blog, especially from the States. And so, on this particularly grey and rainy Tuesday, we would like to give you all a warm and anti-inflammatory welcome to the Food Pharmacy family!

The English translation of the book means a lot to us, since it’s a great opportunity to reach a much larger audience. It may sound pretentious, but our goal is to improve global health by presenting the latest research in a way that ordinary people will understand, and inspire healthier eating – all over the world. Changing our lifestyle is one of the simplest, quickest, and most effective ways to influence our well-being.

Since the book came out, we’ve done a lot of interviews. The most scary one (but also such a fun experience) was without a doubt a couple of days ago, when we made our radio debut in English on oneradionetwork.com with Patrick Timpone. Patrick asked us about our favorite ingredient (we get that question a lot). The answer? We love turmeric.

Turmeric is one of the most anti-inflammatory herbs in existence. One of the most inflammation-causing genes is COX-2, and scientists have worked for decades to discover a drug that can inhibit it. It’s not been easy, but believe it or not, turmeric has proved to be a strong and nontoxic COX-2 inhibitor. If you would like to learn more about turmeric (and a million other things), you should definitely get our book, in which we’re distilling our wisdom into an easy guide.

Tomorrow, we’re off to New York City to promote the book, and perhaps say hello to some of the new readers out there. When we meet people for the first time, we like to offer them our anti-inflammatory turmeric apple cider vinegar shot, or as we often call it, Food Pharmacy’s Welcome Shot.

A couple of weeks ago, we found ourselves (and our anti-inflammatory turmeric shot) featured on the lovely mindbodygreen.com. They say it’s the turmeric shot you’ll want to do every morning in 2018, and we totally agree. So, to both new and loyal readers, allow us to express our warmest welcome to Food Pharmacy by offering a welcome shot.

Food Pharmacy’s Anti-inflammatory Turmeric Shot

100 ml (2/5 cup) juice of your choice (if you’re hard-core, go for plain water)
1 tablespoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch ground cloves
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

Stir together all ingredients, then shoot! Take 1 to 2 times a day, in the morning or evening.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our first book in English, German, or Polish. And our cookbook in Swedish. And buy professor Bengmark’s Synbiotic15.

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Food Pharmacy, Press

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SVT Agenda

On Sunday we gathered excitedly around the tv to watch SVT Agenda. We knew it would be about intestinal flora, and whether the current interest in this subject is just a passing fad or something that’s here to stay (spoiler alert: it’s here to stay). What we didn’t know, however, was that we would be part of the program.

So, as long as we’re talking about it, we figured we might as well share some bad-quality screenshots for your enjoyment:

There was a clip from this past spring, when we were invited to appear on the Swedish tv-show “Malou after ten.” And appear we did, complete with banana sweatshirt ​and all.

Ok, enough about us. Let’s instead focus on the fact that our new guest blogger, science journalist Henrik Ennart, was interviewed during the program. And, sitting there directly to his left, we found our friend Anna, who runs one of our favorite restaurants in Stockholm, Pom & Flora,  together with her husband Rasmus. Hi Henrik! Hi Anna!

And hello Tim Spektor! We don’t​ ​know you but we read everything you write. By the way, can you give us your address so that we can send you our book as soon as it’s published in English (early January)? Thanks in advance and hugs!

If you know Swedish, see the full section here.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our first book in German here or in Polish here, and our new cookbook in Swedish here. And buy professor Bengmark’s Synbiotic15 here.

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New study: Vegetarian diet reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease

It’s late November, and we’re here at Landvetter Airport, close to Gothenburg. We’re about to head home to Stockholm, having just given a lecture on intestinal flora for 130 employees at Volvo.

When we’re out giving talks about diet and health, we get many questions about a variety of diseases. There are questions about everything from diabetes and cancer, to Alzheimer’s and IBS. But to date we haven’t received a single question on cardiovascular disease. However, cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death in Sweden. Although fewer people are currently dying from it (due to both major progress in research and better acute care for heart disease), the Heart-Lung Foundation’s yearly Heart Report still shows that more and more people are currently living with serious risk factors for cardiovascular disease. And the culprit seems to be our lifestyle.

A few years ago, we interviewed chief physician David Stenholtz. David told us that there are many lifestyle-related diseases that can be eliminated almost exclusively with diet, including cardiovascular disease. This we noted diligently, and yet inside our heads the question remained: Can it really be that simple – that the food we eat can help prevent what has become the most common cause of death in Sweden?

Recently, at the American Heart Association’s annual congress, a study was presented showing that for people who switched to a vegetarian diet, the risk was significantly reduced for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis in just four weeks. The study group included 31 obese people, each with high blood-fat levels, all of whom were put on a vegetarian diet. At both the start and the conclusion of the study, blood-fat levels were measured against the numbers that are most common for those suffering from heart disease, and the results showed that all blood fats (especially Lp (a), cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B and A-1, LDL-particles, small-density LDL-C, HDL2-C and apolipoprotein A-1) were decreased by between 15-30%.

Time for boarding. We sat down on row 26 and agreed on that if it’s that easy to prevent cardiovascular disease through maintaining a healthy diet, we should spread the news, the best way we can.

You’re more than welcome to follow us on Facebook and Instagram. And buy our first book in German here or in Polish here, and our new cookbook in Swedish here. And buy professor Bengmark’s Synbiotic15 here.

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